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About

 

Our Mission

Our mission is to celebrate the connection between personal health and wild lands.

We manifest this goal through promoting and practicing sustainable practices. A few examples of our work include growing and preparing local, wild and living food for the community, driving a vegetable oil-run vehicle, utilizing solar dehydrators, using a bicycle powered blender and wheatgrass juicer and educating about the great value of wild foods and wild lands in the school systems.

The Turtle Family

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Who We are: 

                                             

Katrina Blair at the Durango Farmer's Market

Katrina Blair began studying wild plants in her teens when she camped out alone for a summer with the intention of eating primarily wild foods. She later wrote â??The Wild Edible and Medicinal Plants of the San Juan Mountains for her senior project at Colorado College. In 1997 she completed a MA at John F Kennedy University in Orinda, CA in Holistic Health Education. She founded Turtle Lake Refuge in 1998, a non-profit, whose mission is to celebrate the connection between personal health and wild lands. She teaches sustainable living practices, permaculture and wild edible and medicinal plant classes locally and internationally. She is the author of a book titled Local Wild Life- Turtle Lake Refuges Recipes for Living Deep published in 2009 that focuses on the uses and recipes of the local wild abundance.  Her latest book is "The Wild Wisdom of Weeds: 13 Essential Plants for Human Survival" published in 2014 by Chelsea Green.

 

Our Location Downtown

We are located at 848 E. 3rd Ave. in Durango, Colorado; we are in the same building as Rocky Mountain Retreat. The main entrance for Turtle Lake Refuge is in the back of the building in the alley. You may also enter from the front by using the pathway on the south side of the building.

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The Story of Turtle Lake Refuge